Turn Around Norman @ 49 West

Today was a beautiful day and I headed out to Annapolis, MD for a flood relief benefit that Turn Around Norman was playing at. Below are some images and a short clip of one of their tunes!


aperture: 5.0, shutter speed: 1/15, ISO 800, exposure +1


aperture 5.6, shutter speed: 1/30, ISO 1600 (stupid grain!)


aperture 5.6, shutter speed 1/30, ISO 1000


aperture: 5.6, shutter speed: 1/30, ISO 800


aperture: 5.0, shutter speed: 1/30, ISO 800


aperture: 5.6, shutter speed: 1/15, ISO 800, exposure +1 (love Cam’s face here. That guy’s got a lot of heart.)


Turn Around Norman performing an original composition by Cam Collins at 49 West on March 7, 2010. You’ll have to pardon my shaky camera work, never done video before.

Advertisements
Turn Around Norman @ 49 West

Works Well Under Pressure

Have you ever wanted to ditch your life and go on a whirlwind adventure that lasts a lifetime? (Boy, that sounded like some lame plug to a travel blog.) But if lots of people feel this way, why don’t we? I’m one of those people that works well under pressure. And considering that’s a pretty common phrase, I’d assume that there are many, many others who also work well under pressure. I was giving it some thought, what exactly does working well under pressure mean. For me, it means that I step up when it matters, when I have to.

But on the other hand, I have a lot of social anxiety when I feel pressured by other people to perform in a certain way – did I say something stupid, why are they all looking at me, am I being left out – etc. Fairly benign things, but I have the habit of taking them to their extremes and internalizing everything to the point of curl-in-a-ball, cry on a sunny afternoon, bouts of depression. Oh, turns out that there might actually be a reason why people suffer from depression, and it’s fairly positive. Check out the Times article, Depression’s Upside: Is there an evolutionary purpose to feeling really sad? It says in the article that Darwin actually suffered from terrible mental health and he was so perplexed by it, because his most important scientific findings and theories support the notion that his depression makes him a weak-link in evolution or a freakish anomaly. This is reassuring for some reason. But I digress…

So, if depression helps people fixate and analyze things better, and if I work well under pressure, wouldn’t the most logical thing be for me to throw caution to the wind and just go for the adventure? Because survival in some form or another will kick in? Plus, what adds more pressure to your life than your money running out, having to scrounge for food and needing to find shelter? Now you might wonder, hey, this is just a one-way stop to homelessness. Don’t you see all those homeless people living out on the streets? Well, yes I see them. But I’m under the impression that most homeless people end up that way because they’re seriously mentally ill or have other issues. I realize that I’m coming from a place of privilege and that I have the resources (I have skills so I could work if need be, I have parents who would help if need be, etc.) to avoid ending up completely lost. …Would knowing that I have these resources/back-up-plans make me feel any less pressured? Probably. …Maybe this is just an unachievable human desire…

My other thought was that people should go on these non-stop adventures on the premise that they’d kill themselves when they stop. Talk about pressure! And it doesn’t have to be some road-to-hell, drugs-sex-alcohol, craziness a la Hunter Thompson. You could actually go out and make a real difference. What if your adventure was to help every person who ever asked you for help. And when people stopped asking or when you had no more to give, bang. Off with your head. I think I just have the desire to see what I’m capable of. But that’s the problem with life. Life itself doesn’t pressure an individual person. Pressure is just a construction by other people put onto you. So, it’s like I know I’m not achieving all I can, because there’s no pressure. Hence, my thinking on the off with your head bit. And the whole, you could get hit by a bus, so live every day like it’s your last, is too hyperbolic for me. I want to sign a contract or something (in blood of course.) Anyway…

I saw Sheryl WuDunn, co-author of Half the Sky–this amazing book that basically posits that gender inequity will be the global initiative of the 21st century, speak today. She talked about many of the stories from the book, but she also offered a Hawaiian parable. Often when talking about changing the world, people feel overwhelmed and think how can I make a difference, what can I do, it’s too big for me to solve, etc. But she said this:

There’s a boy walking along the beach. There are hundreds of starfish on the beach, just hundreds, completely covered. And he walks along and every few steps, he bends over and picks one up and tosses it back into the ocean. And he keeps doing this. He’s thrown in maybe five starfish, when an older man passes by him. The old man says, Child, what are you doing?! You’ll never make a difference, look around, there are too many starfish. And the boy bends down and picks up a starfish and throws into the ocean. And the boy says, I sure made a difference to that one.

The meaning of life might just be throwing a starfish into the ocean.

For more on Half The Sky, which if you only read one book this year – it should be that one, visit their website: Half The Sky Movement.

Works Well Under Pressure

Out of Your Head Anniversary

Last night, I went to the 1 year anniversary of Out of Your Head. The basic gist of OOYH is that it’s a collective of area musicians who create improvised music every week in groups that do not ever play together normally. OOYH holds a special place in my heart because A is the co-founder. In addition, many of my friends are part of the collective. If you want to know more, check out the OOYH website.

I’ve taken photos of their performances before, and well it’s not easy to photograph a performance/event. Especially, at an intimate place like The Windup Space. I’m not really comfortable drawing attention to myself moving around the stage, or distracting the audience or the musicians. They might not even notice, but I worry that they do. I’m not all slick like a photo ninja, but I guess I won’t ever be if I don’t try harder. It’s also especially difficult because not only is it low light, and I don’t use flash because again, I don’t want to be distracting, and they bop around a lot very quickly. So bottom line, it’s difficult, but I will try, try, try again.

But here are some of the photos that did turn out okay:

John Dierker on reeds.
Auto exposure, 5.6 aperture, 1/6 shutter speed, ISO 1600


Susan Alcorn on Steel Peddle (?) Guitar
Auto exposure, 5.6 aperture, 1/6 shutter speed, ISO 1600


Ellery Eskelin on sax
Auto exposure, 5.6 aperture, 1/6 shutter speed, ISO 1600


Ellery Eskelin on sax
Auto exposure, 5.6 aperture, 1/6 shutter speed, ISO 1600

Out of Your Head Anniversary